Our history

Marine Energy

 

What is wave energy?

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Waves are formed by winds blowing over the surface of the sea. The size of the waves generated will depend upon the wind speed, its duration, and the distance of water over which it blows (the fetch), bathymetry of the seafloor (which can focus or disperse the energy of the waves) and currents. The resultant movement of water carries kinetic energy which can be harnessed by wave energy devices.

(C) AquaretThe best wave resources occur in areas where strong winds have travelled over long distances. For this reason, the best wave resources in Europe occur along the western coasts which lie at the end of a long fetch (the Atlantic Ocean). Nearer the coastline, wave energy decreases due to friction with the seabed, therefore waves in deeper, well exposed waters offshore will have the greatest energy.

There are many designs being pursued by developers to harness the power of waves. Visit Wave Devices for an overview of the different concepts currently in development.

 

What is tidal energy?

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Tidal streams are created by the constantly changing gravitational pull of the moon and sun on the world’s oceans. Tides never stop, with water moving first one way, then the other, the world over. Tidal stream technologies capture the kinetic energy of the currents flowing in and out of the tidal areas. Since the relative positions of the sun and moon can be predicted with complete accuracy, so can the resultant tide. It is this predictability that makes tidal energy such a valuable resource.

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The highest (spring) tidal ranges are generated when the sun, moon and earth are in line. Water flows in greater volumes when attracted by this combined gravitational pull. The lowest (neap) tidal ranges are generated when the sun, moon and earth describe a right angle. The split gravitational pull causes water to flow in lesser volumes.

Tidal stream resources are generally largest in areas where a good tidal range exists, and where the speed of the currents are amplified by the funnelling effect of the local coastline and seabed, for example, in narrow straits and inlets, around headlands, and in channels between islands.

 

CURRENT EMEC CLIENTS

Alstom

Alstom

hammerfest

hammerfest

Aquamarine

Aquamarine

atlantis

atlantis

bluewater

bluewater

kawasaki

kawasaki

openhydro

openhydro

pelamis

pelamis

scotrenewables

scotrenewables

scottish_power

scottish_power

seatricity

seatricity

Vattenfall

Vattenfall

voith

voith

Wello

Wello

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